Mario Sundar's Speakeasy

Spero Ventures. Early LinkedIn, Twitter. These are my thoughts on tech, brand, marketing and community.

Top 10 Corporate Blogs: 2011 Edition

As someone who has studiously put together the top 10 business blog listings since 2006 (here’s the first such post that garnered over 120 comments — long standing record on this blog), I was glad to see another post posing the question “Are these the 10 best corporate blogs in the world?” via Ragan.

Written by Mark Schaefer, who recently taught a class on corporate blogging at Rutgers, the post covers interesting blogs that are not too promotional nor technology focused and I’m glad he did put together this list, cos one of these blogs even crept into our top 10 listings. Read on.

Couple of quick thoughts before I present to you the latest ranking of the most popular corporate blogs on the planet (methodology for the ranking is given below). The reason I started tracking these rankings was to identify the corporate blogs that stand the test of time within certain commonly agreed upon criteria. What’s interesting is that the top 10 blogs have pretty much stayed the same over time with the inclusion of some fast growing blogs (like Mint and this week’s new entrant – Whole Foods).

Without further ado, I give you the current state of the corporate blogosphere and the Top 10 corporate blogs ranked by Technorati [Disclosure: I run LinkedIn’s corporate blog, since 2007, which has been a Top 10 blog].

Top 10 Corporate Blogs in 2011 (per Technorati Authority)

General Motors, Monster, Dell and Digg have fallen off the Top 15 list. In particular, I’m surprised by Dell’s fall since I bet it has something to do with their restructured domain space (Yahoo! had the same problem), cos I know how well managed they both are. The ones in red are the blogs that are going down in the rankings and the green ones are either new entrants or the ones that are rising (some, fast) in popularity – for e.g. Delta and Whole Foods.

Note: Click through the above brand names to get to their corporate blog and feel free to bookmark them or subscribe to their posts on your favorite RSS reader.


Methodology:
I’m using the New PR Wiki (Corporate blog listings) and Technorati authority to help navigate the corporate blogosphere terrain. This term made most sense to rank corporate blogs for 2 reasons.

1. Popularity

“It is the # of blogs linking to a website in the last 6 months. The higher the number, the more authority the blog has”.

Not only does that give a clear indication of the popularity, it also provides context for this rank in the past 6 months. You’ll be surprised at the number of dead blogs in the list, since the last ranking.

2. It’s the number of blogs vs. number of links that’s being measured

It is important to note that we measure the number of blogs, rather than the number of links. So, if a blog links to your blog many times, it still only count as +1 toward your authority. Of course, new links mean the +1 will last another 180 days

Also, if you find any corporate blog (official) that find themselves in the middle of the above rankings, please let me know by leaving a comment.

Given my experience, both starting and running a corporate blog, I’ll continue investigating best practices and sharing them here. If you’re interested in learning more, please consider subscribing to this blog.

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Filed under: Business Blogging

Top 5 Corporate Blogs’ Front Page Structure

Just today Jakob Nielsen’s Alertbox published the findings of a recent eye tracking study on the reading habits around corporate blogs. Of course, I find this of immense interest both as the blog editor of a Top 10 corporate blog (LinkedIn), but more so since I publish rankings for the Top 10 corporate blogs out there. I found this a perfect opportunity to re-rank the top business blogs out there and study their front page structure.

More on the front page structure of the Top 5 Corporate blogs (ranked August 2010), after this confusing graphic.

Confusing Jakob Nielsen graphic comparing full articles vs. summaries

Before I continue, here were the results of the eye tracking study: “Showing summaries of many articles is more likely to draw in users than providing full articles, which can quickly exhaust reader interest.” This is probably true of all blogs but more so for corporate blogs which for the most part are just a feed of breaking news press release style items. That said, I’m glad to announce that we’re considering a redesign for the LinkedIn blog (more on that later). But, I digress…

Here are the top five corporate blogs on the planet today (based on Technorati Authority, Aug 2010) show an interesting breakdown and development in terms of their front page structure and design. Read on. Please note: these reviews are purely on front page design as well as social media engagement.

1. Google: While Google’s corporate blog has a killer Technorati popularity ranking, it’s design is pretty staid and boring – providing full articles, while not doing much to engage ANY conversation at all. No comments nor focus on the author of the post makes this blog as useful as a press center and that’s how Google wants to play it. Brand recognition, over 600K subscribers to the blog, over a million followers on Twitter ensures they’re widely read, but if you’re a small business owner and want to create an engaging blog with compelling content to educate your users – see #4 on this list (Mint blog). If you’re a brand that wants to create a press center 2.0, this model may suffice. Again, from a front page design perspective – THUMBS DOWN.

Google Blog's front page design


2. Facebook: Facebook’s corporate blog moved up in the rankings overtaking Twitter’s blog and their newly redesigned front page is only gonna help them further give Google’s blog a run for it’s money. Positives: Simple, easy to use design aesthetics, integration with Facebook (whether it’s the post author’s Facebook profile or integration with the Facebook fan page, which has over 15 million followers!), engaging design – summaries over full articles, terrific share functionality (Comments, Likes and Share – again fully integrating into the design one expects to see within Facebook), Facebook connect integration (Duh!), and each post also links to topic category links (brilliant!). Love everything about the blog front page / design / usability. THUMBS UP. AWESOMENESS!

Facebook's newly redesigned corporate blog front page

3. Twitter: Moved down a spot since last year’s corporate blog rankings, Twitter’s blog is currently HOT cos Twitter’s hot, but again they closely mimic the Google model. No comments nor integration with their product (their posts don’t even have a retweet button!!!) and it takes forever to identify the author of the post. Again, this is but a press center 2.0 model. Decent integration with the corporate Twitter account doesn’t make up for a poor front page design. THUMBS DOWN.

Newly redesigned Twitter business blog front page

4. Mint: Mint’s blog even prior to the Intuit acquisition, set the standard when it came to CONTENT. They created the most compelling, objectively viewed content around personal finance and data, which got organically picked up by the blogosphere and press in general. No wonder they have rocked to the Top 5 and are at #4, this year. From a front page design, they’re a tad cluttered, but contain all the hallmarks of a great content portal – carousel with featured stories, broad categories and personal finance that is easily accessible, article summaries vs. full articles, great sharing tools (integration with Facebook, Twitter, Stumble Upon, etc.), and JUST GREAT CONTENT that focuses on the product. THUMBS UP!

Mint's Corporate Blog front page: a bit noisy, but great content

Another corporate blog that kicks butt in the CONTENT category is Ok Cupid. Their content is exceptional and is quoted by mainstream press by the New York Times, but unfortunately Technorati has screwed up their authority rankings and I’ve no way to verify if they belong to our Top 10 rankings.

5. Yahoo! Search: Another straightforward old school corporate blog design with full articles vs. summaries. Also, Yahoo’s Yodel Anecdotal or Dell’s Direct2Dell corporate blog may have taken this spot if Technorati hadn’t screwed up their rankings this year. As for Yahoo’s Search Corporate blog front page design, I’d have to give it a THUMBS DOWN.

Old school Yahoo! Search corporate blog

Summary: The Top 5 corporate blogs show an interesting breakdown in terms of their full articles vs. summaries with #2 and 4  (both having made a jump to a higher rank this time) and both having not only summaries but also featured story sections with images that help drive engagement around compelling content. #1 and 3 did well because of their brands and their hotness in terms of popularity (in general) and newsworthiness.

While this may work in the short term, I think for business blogs to engage more of their audience I’d rather go the Facebook or Mint blog route. I’m also glad that the next iteration of LinkedIn’s corporate blog (ranked #9 currently on this 2010 listings) will have both a featured stories section as well as summaries over full articles. Stay tuned for more.

In the meanwhile, leave a comment if you feel your favorite corporate blog could be more popular than any of the above five blogs. Would love to know why?

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Filed under: Business Blogging

Top 15 Corporate Blogs (Sept 2008) Shake-up!

Regular readers of this blog know about the feature post that chronicles the ebb and flow of corporate blog rankings (check here and here) that I’ve been maintaining this past year. I currently rank over 125 corporate blogs, most of them culled from the New PR Wiki. Unfortunately, I realize that the New PR Wiki is not current and so I’ve started throwing in more recent corporate blogs.

As I added a couple more blogs from a recent post from Mashable, I realized they shook up the steady rankings of the Top 15, by jumping in at #2 and 4, moving Delta and Kodak out of the rankings for now. Here’s the updated Top 15 Corporate blogs list. If you’d like to help maintain the corporate blog rankings, please leave a comment.

15 Most Popular Corporate Blogs (Technorati ranked) – September 2008 (Updated)

#15. Lenovo – Authority: 123

#14. Marriott – Authority: 135

#13. Mint – Authority: 142

#12. Flickr – Authority: 242

#11. General Motors – Authority: 282

#10. Southwest Airlines – Authority: 284

#9. LinkedIn – Authority: 551

#8. Yahoo! – Authority: 601

#7. Dell – Authority: 569

#6. Facebook – Authority: 779

#5. Yahoo! Search – Authority: 1145

#4. Zillow – Authority: 1230 (NEW)

#3. Adobe – Authority: 1951

#2. Twitter – Authority: 5067 (NEW)

#1. Google – Authority: 10245


Source:
New PR Wiki, Josh Catone’s list of companies that get corporate blogging, Mashable.

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Filed under: Business Blogging

Why do you love corporate blogs? Or, do you?

Mashable says: “Liking a corporate blog is not an easy task, what with all the “propaganda”. But, if there’s one thing I’ve learned editing LinkedIn’s blog is that there’s a ton of useful information that every company can share with their users through a blog, chief among which are breaking news on feature updates, how users use the product and a sense for the work culture at the company. But, I digress.

Despite the opening salvo on the boringness of corporate blogs, Don still loves corporate blogs. Here’s why:

1. Humanize companies –

they provide a human element to something that is devoid of emotion, understanding, and personality.

A good corporate blog should showcase the people behind the company and its products, exploring their personality and enabling readers to connect with them on a personal level. Exactly, why I agree with Hugh Macleod’s Porous Membrane concept.

2. Feedback –

they’re the easiest way to file a complaint and tell more than a recording or a customer service agent that something is wrong.

Corporate blogs were started to enable true conversation between companies and users. However, not all corporate blogs have enabled comments (think Google, Apple, etc…). Leaving comments on an appropriate feature post is a good way to provide feedback and draw attention to the issue at hand, but more importantly filing a complaint with customer service is a necessary next step. Check out LinkedIn’s Customer Service Site.

Don also gives some examples of corporate blogs he admires like Google (#1 on our most recent Top 15 list), Zillow, Garmin and Twitter which shook up the Top 15 rankings. Find out more here. Don, any more corporate blogs to add to our rankings?

So, why do you love corporate blogs? Or, do you?

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Filed under: Business Blogging

Top 15 Corporate Blogs (Ranked – Sept 2008)

Quick Update: There’s been a small revision in the Top 15 – Sept 08. After I published the post, I was left wondering how Yahoo!, one of the pioneers in this space, didn’t find itself in the Top 15. The culprit – a URL change! My friend, Nicki Dugan, wrote in saying:

We’re now tracked under http://ycorpblog.com, which appears to have a 601 Technorati ranking (and that’s only been earned since we made the URL change in January and doesn’t include previous rankings since August 2006).

I’ve made the change in the countdown, Nicki. Yahoo!’s blog now shows up at #6, moving the LinkedIn Blog down to #7. I’m glad we remedied the situation since Yahoo! has been one of the pioneers in the corporate blogging space along with Dell – thanks to Nicki & team.


It’s time for another edition of Top 15 Corporate Blogs, and you’re in for a few surprises. I was glad to find that our most recent ranking (May 08) now finds mention in the Wikipedia entry on Corporate Blogging.

What’s different?
There seems to be a slight rearrangement in 12 of the 15 blogs you saw in the May 08 rankings. We also find four new corporate blogs have crept up the charts – Southwest Airlines, Marriott, Lenovo and the Mint blog. And, for some reason Digg (Editor – Jen Burton) seems to have fallen off of Technorati’s radar.

Interestingly, I’ll be on 2 panels at Blog World Expo 2008 (Sept 19 – 21) with 6 of these 15 bloggers. But, I digress… let’s get started. I give you, the Top 15 corporate blogs as of September 2008 (after the jump).

Top 15 Corporate Blogs

Marketing Nirvana's Top 15 Corporate Blogs

15 Most Popular Corporate Blogs (Technorati ranked) – September 2008

#15. Delta – Authority: 109 (Down from #12)

#14. Kodak – Authority: 120 (Down from #13)

#13. Lenovo – Authority: 123 (New)

#12. Marriott – Authority: 135 (New)

#11. Mint – Authority: 142 (New)

#10. Flickr – Authority: 242 (Down from #3)

#9. General Motors – Authority: 282 (Up from #10)

#8. Southwest Airlines – Authority: 284 (New)

#7. LinkedIn – Authority: 551 (Up from #8)

#6. Yahoo! – Authority: 601 (Up from #11)

#5. Dell – Authority: 569 (Up from #6)

#4. Facebook – Authority: 779 (Same)

#3. Yahoo! Search – Authority: 1145 (Up from #5)

#2. Adobe – Authority: 1951 (Same)

#1. Google – Authority: 10245 (Same)


Source:
New PR Wiki and Josh Catone’s list of companies that get corporate blogging.

Moving forward, I’d like to consolidate Debbie Weil’s list of 67 Big Brand corporate blogs, many of whom find mention in the master list of 121 blogs that yield the Top 15.

Methodology. I’m using Technorati authority to help navigate the corporate blogosphere terrain. This term made most sense to rank corporate blogs for 2 reasons.

1. Popularity

“It is the # of blogs linking to a website in the last 6 months. The higher the number, the more authority the blog has”.

Not only does that give a clear indication of the popularity, it also provides context for this rank in the past 6 months. You’ll be surprised at the number of dead blogs in the list, since the last ranking.

2. It’s the number of blogs linking to you vs. total number of links

It is important to note that we measure the number of blogs that link to the corporate blog, rather than the total number of incoming links. So, if blog A links to your blog many times, it still only count as +1 toward your authority. Of course, new links mean the +1 will last another 180 days

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Filed under: Business Blogging

Top 3 Corporate Blogs in India

We’re nearing my quarterly review of the Top 15 Corporate Blogs (Ranked last in May 2008). Before we get to the September ranking (a week from now) I thought I’d focus this week’s start on Indian companies’ foray into corporate blogging. This recent article in an Indian newspaper confirmed that belief. Here’s a brief synopsis:

1. Corporate Blogging has slowly but surely made it’s presence in India felt, esp. over the past 3 years:

Corporate blogging has marked its presence in India only from 2005. The pace is much slower in India when compared to that in any other country; however it is growing fast.

2. Smaller companies are seeing corporate blogs as a necessary marketing communications tool as they grow to encompass other countries. For e.g.

Narendra Barhate, managing director and CEO of city-based Seed Infotech, said, “We will launch our corporate blog in two months. Once we started to expand we realised the need for a corporate blog. Recently we expanded our business to China and corporate blogs are the need of the hour.”

3. Indian companies from tech superstars to startups are using corporate blogs as “a cost-effective method to reach out to their clients and also for brand building.”

Here’s a sampling of corporate blogs from some of India’s Tech Superstars. For readers of this blog, I’ve also linked to the Wikipedia page of these companies:

1. Infosys (check blog here)

2. TCS (check blog here)

4. HCL Technologies (check out CEO Vineet’s blog here)

For the life of me, I couldn’t find the corporate blogs of other companies mentioned in the article like IBM India nor Wipro. The above three blogs themselves have a long way to go as far as pursuing best practices in corporate blogging.

It’ll be interesting to see if any corporate blogger in the burgeoning India market would be interested in ranking corporate blogs in India similar to the Corporate Blog rankings I maintain.

Thoughts. Let me know.

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Filed under: Business Blogging

Rating Corporate Blogs. Plus, my blog pick for the week!

Not another corporate blog pick. I hear you say. But, I wouldn’t have gone down this path, if not for Web Worker Daily’s post on how company blogs can provide big insights. He then goes on to provide a list of criteria for evaluating the efficiency of corporate blogs and I couldn’t help measure the LinkedIn Blog (which I edit) against it.

A good company blog lets us know about new features, gives us tutorials and tips, and presents us with useful information related to their product or service. It gives us a glimpse into what they do and often why they do it. It also makes my experience more personal by giving me names and faces to associate with the company.

Breaking News on new features. Check. User Tips. Check. Names and Faces associated with the company. Check. Actually 50 of my colleagues have blogged on the LinkedIn blog. In addition, we even share user stories on how they have benefited from LinkedIn. Check. Well, enough about us.

As someone immersed in the corporate blogging space I check out different business blogs and their editors, and one of the blogs I’ve been impressed with is Mint’s. Check out the blog here.

3 Reasons I like it:

1. Universal Theme

Whether you’re a Mint user or not. You’ll find their blog a huge help in helping define and refine your personal finance strategies and tactics. Kind of Lifehacker for Personal Finance.

2. Tips

As mentioned above, tips and tricks that readers/users can apply and immediately benefit from, dot Mint’s corporate blog landscape.

Personal Finance Tips from Mints Blog

Personal Finance Tips from Mint's Blog

3. Product education

The most important criteria IMO of a corporate blog’s effectiveness should be how it enhances your usage of the product. I think Mint does a terrific job of explaining universal personal finance concepts yet maintaining a consistent focus on how that translates to your usage of Mint. Nicely done, guys!

Product education through Mints Blog

Product education through Mint's Blog

Looks like Mint’s got a new blog editorLee Sherman. Here’s wishing Lee all the very best!

Any other corporate blog I should know of? Your favorites? Leave a comment.

Filed under: Business Blogging

The 5 Types of Corporate Blogs (with examples)

Given the explosion in the corporate blogging and CEO blogging space, I’ve seen a wide variety of blogs show up this past year. As the idea for such a post was brewing, I was glad to read a recent post on Canada.com’s Gazette, which highlighted the 7 highly effective corporate blogging styles that exist today. So, rather than reinvent the wheel why not start with that post.


(The LinkedIn Corporate Blog on Day 1 – Fond memories)

I, personally, felt that the parody blog does not automatically fit into this model and also that we could collapse Individual blogs to CEO blogs (the more well known form of that blog). So, here goes – the five types of corporate blogs (with examples). Feel free to add your favorite corporate blog in the comments section.

1. Company Blog

This is the most common form of the company blog. IMO, the corporate blog is definitely the next stage in the evolution of the corporate website, which (let’s face it) is pretty much static these days. (Read Jeremiah’s remarkable post on the same theme).

Examples: There are so many examples to choose from. The best place to start would be the ranking of the Top 15 Corporate Blogs (ranked earlier this month) that I published a couple of weeks back. Top 5 include: Google, Adobe, Flickr, Facebook, and Yahoo! Search.

2. CEO Blog

The most famous example would have to be the blog of Jonathan Schwartz, CEO at Sun Microsystems, and I’m amazed how he ever finds time to blog, but I’m really glad he sets such a stellar example. I’ve recommended CEOs to quit full-time blogging but rather work as active contributors to their company blog (examples see above), which would of course depend on their busy schedules.

Examples:
Sun CEO – Jonathan Schwartz’s blog
Boeing VP of Marketing – Randy Tinseth’s blog
Top 10 CEO blogs (2 years ago)

3. Industry Blog

This is an interesting type of corporate blog one that we should beware of, because it places some difficult ethical choices for the company at hand. Just last week, I wrote about Miller Brewing’s pseudo industry blog – Brew blog that purports to be an insider blog, while taking potshots at arch competitor – Anheuser Busch.

This is definitely not an advisable strategy for every company but should be considered an option if you consider yourself or employees in your organization as thought leaders in your respective field/technology and choose to establish a blog to discuss best practices. In that case, however, I’d rather have thought leaders blog on the company’s corporate blog!

Example:
Miller Brewing’s Brew Blog

4. Department or Product Blog

Again, department blog is another common style or kind of blogging, which is very popular and ultimately essential for large organizations (particularly Fortune 500). Cases in point are Microsoft, Sun, or SAP’s developer blogs in any particular space. Google’s extensive array of product blogs across their different product offerings (close to 90 in number) probably is another great example.

Examples:
1. Microsoft Community Blogs
2. SAP IT Blogs or SAP Community Blogs
3. Sun Blogs
4. Google – Product Blogs (see the blog roll on the right sidebar)

5. Customer Service Blog

And, finally, the customer service blog or community blog that I blogged of a few months back. Given the preponderance of community forums and discussion groups as the de facto kind of communication media that companies chose to use as conversation methods with their users (more on this later), I haven’t seen the evolution of this kind of a blog, yet. Instead, I find evangelists of companies choosing to talk to/respond/provide customer service with users who choose to ask on social media sites such as Twitter.

Examples:
1. My response to Steve Rubel
2. My colleague Steve Ganz’s (LinkedIn) response to Erica O’Grady (via Twitter)
3. ComcastCares’ response to Arrington and other Comcast users on Twitter

Filed under: Business Blogging

Top 15 Corporate Blogs (Ranked – May 2008)

Quick Update: 5 of the individuals behind the Top 15 Corporate Blogs will be speaking at Blog World Expo 2008 (Sept 21). Details here. Now, back to the post…

… the series is back. Frequent readers of the blog will realize that some of the big hits on my blog related to either my listing of the Top 10 CEO Blogs or the Top 10 Corporate Blogs.

Interestingly, while I waded more deeply into the realm of the corporate blogosphere and as they have been sprouting everywhere (from Dell to Facebook and the one I helped launch at LinkedIn), I’ve not had the time to pursue ranking that series but enough is enough.

So starting this week, I’ll be publishing the Top 10 15 Corporate Blog rankings on a regular basis. Yay!


Image Source: Blog Biz

I’m also mulling the idea of a series of interviews with the face of these corporate blogs to learn more about how corporate blogs happen, benefits, goals, etc… Stay tuned for that as well. But, I digress…

Methodology. I’m using Technorati authority to help navigate the corporate blogosphere terrain. This term made most sense to rank corporate blogs for 2 reasons.

1. Popularity

“It is the # of blogs linking to a website in the last 6 months. The higher the number, the more authority the blog has”.

Not only does that give a clear indication of the popularity, it also provides context for this rank in the past 6 months. You’ll be surprised at the number of dead blogs in the list, since the last ranking.

2. It’s the number of blogs vs. number of links that’s being measured

It is important to note that we measure the number of blogs, rather than the number of links. So, if a blog links to your blog many times, it still only count as +1 toward your authority. Of course, new links mean the +1 will last another 180 days

Enough said, let’s get started. Given below are the most popular corporate blogs on the planet as of May 2008. Come back next month for a revised set.

15 Most Popular Corporate Blogs (Technorati ranked) – May 2008

#15. Boeing – Authority: 67

#14. Monster – Authority: 73

#13. Kodak – Authority: 105

#12. Delta – Authority: 252

#11. Yahoo! – Authority: 297

#10. General Motors – Authority: 364

#9. Ask – Authority: 364

#8. LinkedIn – Authority: 591

#7. Digg – Authority: 641

#6. Dell – Authority: 799

#5. Yahoo! Search – Authority: 1130

#4. Facebook – Authority: 1478

#3. Flickr – Authority: 1744

#2. Adobe – Authority: 1797

#1. Google – Authority: 8492

Source: New PR Wiki, provides the listing of corporate blogs, which I then rank.

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Filed under: Business Blogging

Will I be fired if I blog? And you just told me corporate blogs were safe?

Summary: Companies are beginning to fire employees for blogging? (w/ stats) — larger picture is “communication tools” not just blogs that should concern employers — what are corporate blogging guidelines?

Statistics (Poll — 308 U.S. companies with more than 1,000 employees):

10% of companies fired an employee for violating corporate blogging or message board policies
19% of companies have disciplined an employee for the same infractions

33% of companies employ staff to read or otherwise analyze outbound email
15% of companies hired people whose primary function is to spy on outgoing corporate email
25% of companies fired an employee for violating corporate email policies
30% of companies had been ordered by a court or a regulator to turn over employee emails
(Source: Wired study)

While all of us corporate blog evangelists (including me, my friends — Mack, Jeremiah and their friends) go about evangelizing the benefits of corporate blogging and how imperative it is to be a part of the conversation, some of us are getting fired … for blogging! Let’s set the facts straight. The above stats refer not solely to blogging but rather to a diaspora of communication tools available to corporate America. So, what are possible ways that employees communicate with one another and to the world in general:

1. Email
2. Discussion forums (Yahoo! Groups, Facebook groups)
3. Blogs (corporate and personal)
4. Instant messaging tools (Y! IM, MSN, Google Talk)
5. Twitter, Jaiku (mini-blog/broadcast tools)
6. Tomorrow, it could be another tool.

What should I do? (employer/employee)
Start a corporate blog! Ha ha. You almost fell for that one.

Most large organizations, I’m sure have a concerted corporate communications policy to deal with infractions that could hurt their billion dollar brand. As far as a corporate blog is concerned, if you decide to allow corporate blogging either within your websites or if you allow your employees to blog, the best way would be for you to craft the guidelines and let them know about it beforehand, so you won’t have to take the extreme step of firing them. Let’s face it, hiring is probably one of the most time consuming and critical decisions you take as a manager and you wouldn’t want to undo all that hard work by not implementing effective guidelines. I wonder what my corporate blogger friends from large corporations like Dell (Lionel Menchaca) and Intel (Ken Kaplan) think of all this.

Here is a perfect guiding principle as far as corporate blogging guidelines are concerned

All of the 8 most well-known corporate blogging policies agree — corporate bloggers are personally responsible and they should abide by existing rules, keep secrets and be nice. Those four principles are the core of today’s corporate blogging rules. (Source: Corporate Blogging Info)

Update: Nate Anderson from ars technica points out the cultural/international differences in corporate blogging perceptions across the globe

That study also revealed intriguing cultural differences between continents. Only 2.5 percent of the included European companies use a corporate blog, a number that was more than doubled in Asia, where 5.5 percent of companies use them. In the US, that number jumps to a whopping 14 percent. Clearly, American executives have gotten the memo that customers and shareholders like to know what’s going on with the firm, and like to see a human face instead of a corporate facade.

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Filed under: Business Blogging